35. Almost wrapping up

Little pleasures make life so much easier:  I found a perfect little handle for the bottom of the hatch which makes lifting easier and looks nice.

 

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A little trim covering the joint where wall meets floor.  No more worry about losing a drill bit down there. (:   I used some old oak corner trim that I’ve had laying around for the front wall/floor joint.

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I make a simple double lift system for the hatch.  Two 1×2 cedar were just the right height. I added a notch and pin to hold them in place; their base rests on the bed.

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The door latch stumped me for a couple of hours.  I ended up getting it done, but the words of one builder were stinging my ears…she said just buy the darn things.   I agree.  Making doors is not for me.

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I did get the doors and hatch taped with a rubber sponge-type material so hopefully stay water- and mosquito-proof.   Like a lot of my building, we’ll see.

The last task of the day was getting the battery box mounted and bolted on. Two 1×6 cedar will provide a lasting base for it.

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15. Insulation and a big hole

Every teardrop I’ve seen uses insulation in the top of the cabin. I think it will help, not so much with the cold -sweaters and hoodies are for that- but with the heat.  It can get quite warm in October.  I imagine I will be happy in the long-term to have joined the crowd.  I see NO use for adding a layer to the walls; 3/4 plywood will do just fine by itself.

I’m using 3/4″ hard foam. One sheet does it all. A very sharp utility knife blade works well.  I have read that a hot knife is super.  Didn’t need it so one less tool to buy. (:

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I drilled up through the ceiling to make a pilot hole and then used a router bit to cut the opening.  Because I was cutting UP,  I got COVERED with the sawdust, in my mouth, nose, ears, hair and shoulders.  Ick.  What a mess.  BIG mistake to not use a mask.  Glad I had my glasses on. The subsequent shower felt very good.